Today in Germany: OUTFITTERY, Axel Springer, Blloon, Readly

3D Scanner in der Deutschen Bank der Zukunft, Berlin Friedrichstraße
3D Scanner in der Deutschen Bank der Zukunft, Berlin Friedrichstraße

Hint: You’re a Germany based startup (or about to launch here soon) and have interesting news to share? Get in touch with us:

Happy Monday! Here are news from Germany’s startup industry:



Axel Springer and New York Times invested in Dutch newspaper app

After investing $20 million in Silicon Valley based newspaper app ozy, German publishing house Axel Springer now invested in the Dutch newspaper app Blendle. The round was joined by The New York Times. Readers can see what friends read, follow interesting curators (e.g. politicians,  journalists, celebrities) and see the recommendations from the paid content section, as well as which articles are trending. While entire newspapers can be bought in the app, an article costs between 10 and 50 cents, VentureVillage was told. The article price is decided by the publishing houses. The revenue is distributed into 70% for the publishing houses and 30% for Blendle. Read more on VentureVillage

Readly starts its German Magazin Flatrate

For €9.99 German folks can now access about 70 German magazines though the Readly App.

OUTFITTERY introduces bodyscanner

Personal Shopping Service OUTFITTERY introduces a bodyscanner. With an infrared camera and projector it scans a man’s size. That information can than be forwarded to its personal shopping assistant to figure out the right size and cut for one. The scanner was tested in Berlin’s Deutsche Bank branch at Friedrichstraße and almost 500 men tried it. Starting in March, OUTFITTERY wants to role out the scanner to German cities (Berlin, Frankfurt, Cologne, Dusseldorf, Munich, Hamburg and Stuttgart), mostly in shopping centers and on airports.

Blloon App Encourages Ebook Reading By Letting Readers Earn Free Pages

Berlin-based startup Blloon has launched an app to get more young people to reading ebooks. This shall be done by applying a freemium model to the medium. gifting a certain number of pages (1,000) when a user signs up, so they can get started reading straight away. That’s enough freebie pages to read up to three full books.