The key to start-up success? Great ideas

Key to start-up success
Key to start-up success

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Is there a key to start-up success?

Thomas Edison said, “To have a great idea, have a lot of them.”  While it’s unclear how Mr. Edison might fare in the start-up scene today, there is no doubt the man was one of the original inventors, entrepreneurs and start-up kings.  Someone who had a lot of ideas and took risks to give these ideas a form.  Maybe you’re inspired to do the same and maybe you’re looking for the key to start-up success.

While there is no one secret, every founder needs a good idea.  Ideas hold an element of risk exactly because of their newness.  They are small ventures into the unknown and without encouragement, hard work and perhaps a bit of luck, they might remain forever dormant.

The thing with new ideas is there is no guide to follow, no manual of instructions that eases the transition.  Whether your idea is to change cities, change your job or initiate smaller, daily changes in your company or life, the only way to describe putting that idea into action is as a leap.  Cost-benefit analysis comes later!  With that said, how can you coax your ideas into manifestation?

1. Don’t ignore your ideas.  A good idea will follow you around.

2. Research.  It may be less fun than daydreaming but reading, talking and connecting with others builds a base from which your idea can grow.

3. Take the first steps.  With stamina and resolution, take the first steps in implementing your idea.  Start small.

4. Be fluid and open to change.  Great ideas are never fixed.  Don’t expect that everything might go exactly to plan.

5.  Move forward or let go.  After a period of incubation and trial and error, be prepared to let it go or move forward with persistence.

6.  Start back at 1.

All these steps are important but perhaps the most important, the most powerful, is the final one.  In the process of researching, tweaking and executing your idea will change but that’s the fun of the unknown and the unique selling point of an idea.  Like Edison also said,

“When you have exhausted all options, remember this – you haven’t.”