A conference guide to rocking LeWeb – 10 tips for first-timers


So, young founder, you’ve forked out for a ticket to LeWeb… How to make the most of it?

With LeWeb 2012 just about done, “business rock ‘n’ roll chick” Henriette Weber reflects on and shares a few top tips for newcomers next year. Read on and learn!


1. Don’t use too much of your time in the plenary rooms

Seats are mostly available in the back and you can’t really get out if you get stuck in the middle of a row. Instead, see if you can forget about it and watch everything interesting online later (and no, I don’t mean the product pitches where people are wearing weird costumes to generate instant viral buzz. It was cool three years ago when Loic le Meur dressed up as an Angry Bird – not any more).

2. Instead, I suggest you hang out in the different buildings and talk to everything with a pulse…

LeWeb '12

3. Check the #leweb twitter feed manically

And use it to get and stay connected. You’re here to network (go on, admit it).

4. Use the hashtag #pimping

Because, well, you are. If you participate in God knows what competition where you can win a computer or something else from the “web of things” – and to make the draw you have to tweet or share something.

5. Be the last one to leave parties

Well, at least one of the last ones. The best business-building always happens at champagne o’clock

6. Approach people and hear their story

They’ll thank you on Twitter later. No, it doesn’t matter if they are from XX country innovation institute and handing out leaflets and you are thinking – “wow, totally innovative handing out leaflets at one of the most innovative gatherings in Europe”. It doesn’t matter if they are wearing Mexican short skirts. They could be a potential network opportunity.

wine Paris7. This is France, but don’t have more than two glasses of wine at lunch

At least I can’t. You don’t want to be drunk talking to people in the afternoon.

8. Don’t get frantic while standing in line

… for one hour to get your badge. Instead, dance to make other people happy or do something to lower your intolerance for queues. This is LeWeb. You’re lucky to be here in the first place! Who cares about the queues?

9. Hold on before leaving a booth until you have a business card

The insecure programmer who just stuttered through a presentation about his business could potentially be a beneficial part of your network.

10. Make some sort of strategic map of who you want to talk to each day

It’s super important. Le Web uses Presdo for the networking, but I have been checking out my guys over at Copenhagen-based startup Conferize all day. Works like a charm.

LeWeb '12

A version of this article originally appeared on HenrietteWeber.comImage credits: LeWeb ’12, by @naro, @naro and @jibees via Flickr user LeWEB12; wine in Paris, by Flickr user rvacapinta


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