This is what you earn in a German startup

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Screen Shot 2014-12-15 at 10.26.41

Earlier this year, we asked our readers to fill out a salary survey that was created by Seedcamp, hub:raum, Point Nine Capital, Redstone Digital, and Axel Springer Plug and Play. Thank you to the 240 people who followed that request.

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Taking the number of answers into account, it needs to be said that it has no general validity. Still, we would like to share it with our readers as it offers some surprises.

The answers

Looking into the numbers, 78% of the responses came from male, 22 % from female participants. The average age was 29. They had an average of 7 years and 7 month work experience, and of that experience, 5 years and 8 months were in the digital sector. 26% of the responders were co-founders.

Not as surprising

Less surprisingly, profitable startups pay better than those that are not profitable. Also, those with only 2 – 10 employees pay less than larger ones. Furthermore, 130 out of 240 startups are not profitable – which is quite common for very young companies.

Surprising

It is interesting that the average salary is higher than previously expected.

A common perception of startups is that they hardly pay. However, according to this study, that is not always the case.

The gap between top managers (€56,100), product managers (€54,360) and developers (€51,000) compared to operations (€38,050) and sales people (€40,000) is recognizable, though.


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Also interesting, the most money was earned in media related startups (average €55,430). FinTech startups pay almost as much (average €55,000).

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Interested in what you would earn in the UK? TechCrunch has the numbers for that.

Here is the entire study:

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