Three things you didn’t know about #WorldCup14

Foto 4 (c) Martin Köhler
Foto 4 (c) Martin Köhler

 

Twitter is not only a great news channel, but also perfect for live events. While it’s often used to comment while watching TV shows, some of the most exciting tweets come from sharing photos, videos and comments on live events.

Sure enough, Twitter is also a great tool to share excitement during the World Cup.

Here are three insights that you might not have heard of:

Feels like home in a stadium

 

width="515"

#WMWohnzimmer was created in cooperation with Twitter. “WMWohnzimmer” means “World Cup Living Room”. Berliners could apply to bring their sofas to the Stadion an der alten Försterei in the southeastern part of the city. Fans managed to bring close to 750 sofas into the stadium. That fits around 12,000 people. Next to the screens that show the game, visitors will find a huge twitter wall that displays all tweets with #WMWohnzimmer.

width="515"

width="515"

#FRA

Those who travel a lot might be aware of the fact that the hashtag used for the French team #FRA is also used for the Frankfurt International Airport (Germany). As Twitter puts the national flags (so-called Hashflags) after the connected hashtag, Frankfurt would appear to be French during the World Cup.

@airport_FRA said that during the World Cup they would loan out the hashtag to France, but they want it back after the finals are over.

Connect with your favorite

Lists of all players and teams are available on Twitter. Your favorite player will probably not post a selfie after a goal, but you might find insights (or selfies) before and after the game.

 

Also, while the same widget is used worldwide to count tweets before each game, every country has a different hashtag for the #WorldCup. In Germany, it’s #WM2014 while it’s #Copa2014 in Portugal.

]

140 characters and 90 minutes. And in the end there will only be one winner.

Not sure where to watch the World Cup? VentureVillage will provide the top 5 places in Berlin on Friday!

Image Source: WMWohnzimmer, Martin Köhler