The Wooga way: Four simple rules to have a successful meeting


Wooga is a gaming company and made it to one of the most known startups based in Berlin. In three rounds, the company raised an overall of $32.2 million.

Having grown to 275 employees in just five years, it was a challenge to keep the company’s culture startup-like.


“We believe that communication is paramount for a company like Wooga, which consists of many autonomously working teams,” says Marie-Blanche Stössinger, Head of PR at Wooga, and adds: “Keeping the exchange between colleagues concise and ensuring that presentations are to the point and as polished as they can be helps us to share learnings while at the same time avoiding the meeting marathon trap.”

Here are the four rules people at Wooga follow to stay on track and make meetings most efficient.

Be on time

To keep everybody in the loop, a Monday meeting takes place every week at 9:30 am. “Be on time or come next week” is the rule. “At 9:28 you’ll see people running towards the meeting room,” states Maike Steinweller, Manager Events & Conferences at Wooga. Same rule is set for the “Studio Weeklies” which takes place from Tuesday to Thursday. If you’re late, you’re out.

Standup meetings

Don’t get too comfortable. Stay focused and awake – and stand. Many startups use standup meetings to ensure people don’t drift away.

Enter a meeting prepared

Topics for Monday meetings are discussed the week before. Those who need to present get informed and are asked to prepare a maximum two minute presentation. Rehearsals take place on Fridays to ensure everybody fits into the schedule.

Meeting rooms cannot be reserved

Wooga only has 10 meeting rooms. Most of them don’t fit more than a good handful of people. These can also not be booked in advance. That is on the one hand to not waste more time on organising a meeting, but also to keep them short and not have people to fall into a regular meeting schedule where it’s not necessary. If things need to be discussed, it’s a simple first come, first served rule.


Image: Su Song, Vertical Media